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Thread: Recurring Tendonitis

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    197

    Default Thanks for advice!

    I've had ultrasound before, hadn't thought about deep tissue massage (hopefully she'll be hot). Will start hitting the Advil again for a while too. Amen on the computer work, me too. Yeah, the pain hits most when palms forward/supinated wrist. Preacher doesn't hurt as much as DBs, just keep switching up I guess. Hammers do help.

    Hey musclecat, best idea for where to get cortisol gel?

    Thanks for all the help FREAKS.

    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides
    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides

  2. #12

    Default FIGHTERS REMEDY!!!

    This might sound out rageouse, but it's true.
    I've had tendonitis ever since i started working out. So i have tried to look for methods to dispell tendonitous for 3 years.
    I stated doing mixed martial arts, and they gave me a remedy that truly works. And it works fast!

    Do a tripple dose of glucosamine and condriton for 2 weeks strait. Simple eh. Oh it works alright. Your tendonitis should disapear within the first week. After that you are just maintaining it.

    I have not had tendinitous ever since then! I was very pleased with the results. And i truly believe you will be too!!! BK

  3. #13

    Default

    hey bro here is an article i picked up awhile back, maybe you will find it useful..i did!
    ...Occasionally I receive letters from powerlifters and see questions/comments on the Internet regarding elbow pain. The squat and the bench press, to name two exercises, seem to be the most common exercises that increase the elbow pain. These lifters usually state that the pain has developed over a period of time, not happening suddenly. On the squat, it starts most frequently while setting up for the lift and during the performance of the lift and for a short time after. When it occurs during the bench press, the athletes state it usually starts approximately 4-5" off of the chest during the descent and gets worse right before and during the pause.
    Unlike the knee, the elbow is able to rotate more than a few degrees either direction. This presents possible future trouble for the elbows of powerlifters. During the squat, the elbow is under a lot of stress as it must help the wrist and hand stabilize the bar on the lifter's shoulders. It is especially under a lot of stress when the athlete places the bar on their shoulders in typical powerlifter fashion - low. By placing the hand on the bar during the squat, one must pronate (turn away from you) the elbow/wrist in order to grip the bar. Doing this over a period of time can sometimes cause chronic elbow pain, usually helped by not squatting. Another cause of this elbow pain during the squat is I see many powerlifters that will push up against the bar while they are holding it on their shoulders. A lot of them do not know they are doing this. This activates the various muscles surrounding the elbow and when done often enough and with enough weight, it will eventually overuse these muscles. This will then lead to microtrauma (small tears in the muscle/tendon) which will eventually lead to formation of scar tissue and then the muscle will become weak and the athlete will develop pain and possibly numbness and tingling below their elbow due to peripheral nerve entrapments of the upper extremity.

    During the bench press, the hands are placed in another pronated position, yet not quite as far when compared to the squat. The elbow flexors must help stabilize the bar during the descent phase of the bench. Again, done over a period of time this could possibly wreak havoc on the elbow joint. This is especially true if the injured athlete's elbow is repeatedly subjected to the main cause (for example, the bench) and then utilized later in the week (during the squat), reaggravating the problem.

    The main elbow structures involved in this problem are the biceps brachii, the brachialis, the brachioradialis, pronator teres and sometimes the triceps. As powerlifters we cannot get away from the hand positions we must use during the lifts. Therefore other measures must be taken. If in pain and you have a meet coming up that you need to train for, try a light-medium wrap job on the affected elbow while training in the gym. This will take some stress off of the joint and not aggravate it as much. I don't recommend doing this too often as one's body can develop a dependency on this support and when it comes time for the meet, it won't be there to help support you. A second measure one can take to either help rehabilitate or prevent future problems is to strengthen the elbow flexors to handle more stress. As powerlifters, we tend to concentrate on the triceps (elbow extensors) more as they are one of the primary movers during the bench press. We must make sure that the elbow flexors receive good quality exercise to keep them strong. This helps keep the muscle balance around the elbow intact and help prevents future joint problems.

    Examples of exercises to do are dumbbell curls (there are many variations of these - either one will work), and barbell curls with either the straight bar or the E-Z curl bar. While doing these to help rehabilitate the elbow, one must do these exercises with light weight, high repetitions (10-20 repetitions) and do this at least 3 times per week. This will force blood and the various nutrients it carries into the muscle/tendon areas and help heal the problem. Stretching the elbow musculature will also help to prevent problems as well. Sometimes elbow pain can come from problems with the wrist and the associated wrist flexors/extensors. If none of the above ideas help, either write/call me or seek the proper chiropractic/medical attention in your area for further advice.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Default Hey BiggDogg

    Thanks for the remedy, I'll try damn near anything once, twice if I like it! Wink I'll be sure to keep you posted.

    That article is pretty solid MightyMouse, had a lot of those same problems when I was PL. Now the frickin' crap has migrated to the inner part of the elbow/forearm. But, the use of various curl movements for rehab/strengthening is still a good use.

    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides
    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    california
    Posts
    78

    Default tendonitis problems

    Hey tensity if you check back to this thread i'm not on much so it's been awhile but if your in good with a DC or a good physical thereapist they might let you have some. Bad thing is you need a script for this.



    "LET DESIRE BE YOUR MOTIVATION"

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    211

    Default

    If you've never heard of ART (Active Release Technique), you might want to check it out. It's a form of soft tissue therapy usually performed by a chiropractor.

    Here's a website for more info:
    http://www.activereleasetechnique.com/

    I had serious issues with my hip flexors and tendonitus in elbows and shoulder before Nationals last year. A good friend is a world level PLer, and he turned me on to this form of therapy. I couldn't even do the splits anymore, my hip flexors hurt so much from overtraining; my ART guy had me fixed and ready to go right in time for Nationals. I still go once a week for maintenance, since I always seem to knock something out of whack weekly. :-) My PL friend placed third in the Worlds this year with a gold in the squat; that's the best he's placed in years. He had so many issues with his shoulder, knees, wrists - you name it - he almost gave up competing. ART has enabled him to continue competing.

    I highly recommend this form of therapy.
    JJ
    NSCA-CSCS
    [URL=http://www.eastcoastgold.org] East Coast Gold Weightlifting Club[/URL]
    [URL=http://www.nabba.com] NABBA USA[/URL]

  7. #17
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    Jun 2003
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    Default

    quote:
    Originally posted by jjfigure:
    If you've never heard of ART (Active Release Technique), you might want to check it out. It's a form of soft tissue therapy usually performed by a chiropractor.

    Here's a website for more info:
    http://www.activereleasetechnique.com/

    I highly recommend this form of therapy.[/quote]

    Yeah, I've actually tried ART for cuff problems, seemed to have some positives but wasn't covered with insurance and was killing the pocket. But, should be covered now and had forgot about ART. Thanks for the reminder, will most definitely revisit.

    Thanks musclecat, I'll see if I can get a script, the problem seems severe enough (and acting never hurts either!) Wink

    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides
    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    california
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Hey Tensity Hope Info helps Wall Ive been dealing with this for years on and of :GOOD HEALTH:



    "LET DESIRE BE YOUR MOTIVATION"

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Beyond
    Posts
    197

    Default Also

    Anyone still use/see Atomic Balm? Confused Our trainers used to use it on us for rehab, etc and DAMN, did that stuff work. Felt great after the initial burn subsided. BK

    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides
    "The strong do what they have the power to do and the weak accept what they have to accept." Thucydides

  10. #20

    Default unfortunately

    time might be your only healer if you continually have this problem. naproxen will help some(as i am sure you know) or a steady dose of advil in your system. that i what i have found with my shoulder tendonitis. it seems to NEVER go away, though. Wall
    "Knowledge is the antidote to fear"

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