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Thread: 14 Day CKD

  1. #1

    Default 14 Day CKD

    Carbohydrate cycling is an effective method for bodybuilders who want to lose fat while preserving a lot of muscle. Two dietary periods are used: glycogen depletion and carbohydrate loading. During carbohydrate restriction, a state of ketosis develops as stored glycogen in liver and muscle tissue depletes. This accelerates fat as a source of energy – consumed through the diet or stored within adipose tissue. I recently finished a 14-day cyclic-ketogenic diet to illustrate how this works. Prior to beginning, I did a seven-day CKD variation for a few weeks, then detrained (no training) for one week. I started at 248 pounds; target weight was 228, glycogen loaded. I ended at a hard 227, glycogen loaded and drug free.

    The 14-day CKD plan consisted of two, week-long, phases. The first week, a glycogen depletion period is interrupted with a mid-phase carbohydrate meal. An evening carbohydrate load partially replenishes glycogen; right after, it is back to depleting again. This carbohydrate intervention is used to help further deplete glycogen by only briefly exiting ketosis. The temporary exodus allows a brief transfer back to preferring carbohydrates for fuel – to scrape the glycogen barrel – then a quick return back into ketosis for optimal fat burning. This maximizes fat burning and muscle retention.

    Glycogen super compensation is attempted every 14 days with a carbohydrate load. Near the conclusion of the second week, a full 36-hour carbohydrate load begins the evening after a full-body depletion routine. The day after the carbohydrate load is a strong power routine with a high-carbohydrate diet at a maintenance caloric intake – to help top off glycogen while providing an opportunity to maintain strength levels. Then the 14-day cycle is repeated.
    Warrior’s 14-day CKD: integrated diet and training strategy
    ============FIRST HALF============

    Day 1: Moderate Carb: 60 minutes of cardio; abdominal/calve training.
    Day 2: Low Carb: Chest and Back Giant Sets; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 3: Low Carb: Quads and Hamstring Giant Sets; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 4: Low Carb: 45-60 minutes of cardio
    Day 5: Preload Carb: Depletion Routine; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 6: Low Carb: No Training
    Day 7: Low Carb: Delts, Triceps and Biceps Giant Sets; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    ===========SECOND HALF===========

    Day 8: Low Carb: Cardio-only; 60 minutes of cardio; abdominal/calve training.
    Day 9: Low Carb: Chest and Back Tension Training; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 10: Low Carb: Quads and Hamstring Tension Training (w/abs, calves); 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 11: Low Carb: 50-60 minutes of cardio
    Day 12: Preload Carb: Depletion Routine; 30-45 minutes of cardio
    Day 13: Carb Load: No Training
    Day 14: High Carb: Loaded Routine; 20 minutes of cardio
    ============REPEAT============

    Low Carb: basically meats, eggs and fibrous veggies; around 30-50 grams of carbohydrates. The only intentional carbohydrate intake should be post-workout with a heavy emphasis on protein. Take 10 grams of BCAA’s pre-workout. A post-workout mix of glutamine, whey, and creatine would serve up well: about 3 parts, 3 parts, 1 part, respectively; mixed with half of an orange or banana.
    Preload Carb: Same as a Low Carb, but with slightly less calories during the day. The carbohydrate preload begins in the evening with around 30 grams pre-workout. This can help further deplete glycogen during the training session – 30 grams burns quickly, leaving the body scavenging for more. Immediately after the workout, a heavy carbohydrate and protein shake should be consumed. Then move into a full carbohydrate load, or binge. The first week employs this Preload Carb day but carbohydrate intake ends that night and it’s back to low carbohydrate dieting the next day. The second week moves on to a Carb Load day, where expedited glycogen super compensation is the goal.
    Carb Load: An all-out binge of carbohydrates and proteins – trying to eat every hour. Nutrient intake can easily exceed over 5000 kcal, depending on lean body mass. Play with the caloric intake levels, but avoid high-fat foods after the initial 12 to 14 hours from the time the load began, the night before. It’s common to feel bloated with some gastro-intestinal discomfort. Creatine monohydrate and dextrose should accompany the glycogen load.
    High Carb: Maintenance calories at roughly 60 percent carbohydrate, 25 percent protein and 15 percent fat.
    Moderate Carb: A slight drop in calories – to create a defecit – with roughly 40 percent carbohydrates, 30 percent protein and 30 percent fat. The day’s carbohydrate intake ends in the afternoon.
    DAILY NUTRITION: A daily multivitamin/mineral shoud be taken during this restrictive diet to support systemic bodily functions. Three grams of a fish oil supplement will increase the omega-3 content of each meal. Around four grams of Vitamin C will help keep you well and burning fat. Additionally, stimulants can help keep energy elevated but try to avoid caffeine on Carb Load days.

    Training guidelines for Warrior’s 14-day CKD

    Depletion workouts the first week use German Body Composition for Chest and Back; Quadriceps and Hamstrings; Shoulders and Arms. GBC is a training outline originated by Charles Poliquin, a great strength coach. It is based on short rest intervals to increase production of lactate, which leads to dramatic increases in endogenous growth hormone spurts, thus resulting in greater body fat loss. The second half, drop with GBC training and move to Tension Training. The goal the second week is simply keep the muscles trained.

    On the Preload Carb days, a full-body Glycogen Depletion Routine is used to finish depleting muscular glycogen throughout the body. This helps maximize glycogen uptake sensitivity in all muscle groups prior to ingesting carbohydrates. The goal is to exhaust glycogen throughout the body, prior to a carbohydrate load – not make monumental gains in strength. An opportunity for power training comes after the load, when energy levels are restored.

    The day after a carbohydrate load, a Carb/Creatine Loaded Routine is performed as a full body power routine prior to beginning another depletion phase. The main goal of this routine is to move heavier weight – power train. This is the most important routine to monitor limit strength and muscle preservation. The total time to completion for the routine is also a significant variable – if you move the same loads but the workout is taking you 20 minutes longer, this is not a good sign.

    GBC Training
    This resistance training program is divided into these muscle groups with the same movements for the duration of the program. Giant sets are grouped in sequence by letters and performed in order by number.

    Chest and Back
    Chest
    A1: (6) Flat Barbell Press
    Rest 10 seconds
    A2: (12) 45 Degree Incline Dumbbell Press
    Rest 10 seconds
    A3: (25) 30 Degree Incline Dumbbell Flye
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Back
    B1: (6) Wide Grip Pull Ups
    Rest 10 seconds
    B2: (12) Bent Barbell Rows
    Rest 10 seconds
    B3: (25) Close Grip Front Pulldowns
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times

    Quadriceps and Hamstrings
    Quads
    A1: (6) Full Barbell Squats
    Rest 10 seconds
    A2: (12) Hammer Strength Hack Squats
    Rest 10 seconds
    A3: (25) Hammer Strength Quad Extensions
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Hams
    B1: (6) Hammer Strength Leg Curls
    Rest 10 seconds
    B2: (12) Romanian Deads
    Rest 10 seconds
    B3: (25) Back Extensions
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times

    Shoulders and Arms
    Delts
    A1: (6) Front Military Press
    Rest 10 seconds
    A2: (12) Standing Dumbbell Laterals
    Rest 10 seconds
    A3: (25) Standing Upright Rows
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Triceps
    B1: (6) Flat Close Grip Presses
    Rest 10 seconds
    B2: (12) Incline Triceps Extensions
    Rest 10 seconds
    B3: (25) Standing Rope Extensions
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times
    Biceps
    C1: (6) Incline Dumbbell Curls
    Rest 10 seconds
    C2: (12) Standing Barbell Curls
    Rest 10 seconds
    C3: (25) Standing Reverse Grip Cambered Curls
    Rest Interval: 2 minutes
    Repeat 2 times

    Tension Training
    This routine divides the body’s muscle systems into two workouts. To monitor changes in limit strength, continue to use the same movements for the duration of the program. The static training should track the amount of time the muscle can hold the load in the fully contracted position.

    Upper Body
    (2X10) Barbell Bench Press
    (2X12) Wide Grip Pull Ups
    (2X12) Hammer Strength Incline Press
    (2X12) Hammer Strength Close-Grip Rows
    (2X15) Machine High-Pulley Crossovers
    (2X15) Incline Dumbbell Shrugs
    Rest Interval: Variable

    Lower Body
    (1X10,1X20) Leg Press
    (2X15) Hammer Strength Leg Extension
    (2X15) Machine Standing Iso-Lateral Leg Curls
    (T sec) Static Hammer Calve Raise
    (T sec) Static Straight-Leg Raises
    Rest Interval: Variable

    The Glycogen Depletion Routine
    This routine (setsXreps) should use the same movements, number of sets and repetitions, in the same order, to monitor changes in limit strength.

    (2X15) Full Barbell Squats
    (2X10) Hammer Strength Leg Curls
    (2X15) Hammer Strength Quad Extensions
    (2X20) Seated Calve Raise
    (2X12) Barbell Bench Press
    (2X12) Bent Barbell Rows
    (2X12) Military Front Press
    (2X15) Close Grip Pulldowns
    (2X10) Incline Tricpes Extensions
    (2X10) Standing Barbell Curls
    (2X20) Back Extensions
    (2X20) Rope Crunches

    The Carb/Creatine Loaded Routine
    This routine (setsXreps) should use the same movements, number of sets and repetitions, in the same order, to monitor changes in limit strength.

    (5X6) Full Barbell Squats
    (5X3) Rack Dead Lifts
    (5X5) Barbell Bench Press

  2. #2

    Default

    alot of great infomation mate, learners should definitely try this out

  3. #3

    Default great stuff strapping young lad.

    Read your post on carb restriction, great stuff this is a two week diet correct. I weigh in at 247 lbs mostly muscle some fat. What's carbs should I be taking in during this diet. I know u explained in your post but there was tons of info so I guess I would like u to restate it. Also I stopped drinking the reply u sent me last week opened my eyes. Aslo taking sust 250 would this affect gains if I try this diet

  4. #4

    Default

    Well congrats on taking responsibility for your own well-being. This is a great strategy for cutting without losing muscle, but not the best for making gains. I wouldn't run it on-cycle. As for the carb question, I'm not sure I understand what it is. Yes, this is a 2 week cycle to be repeated 4 or 5 times for an 8-10 wk diet.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Im guna be hitting this to get my BF% low enough for me to comfortably start a cycle come Fall/winter. Cant wait! Excellent post

  6. #6

    Default

    Yeah, and running this pre-cycle will help improve insulin sensitivity as well, which should translate to greater gains on cycle.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StrappingYoungLad View Post
    Yeah, and running this pre-cycle will help improve insulin sensitivity as well, which should translate to greater gains on cycle.
    Giggidy

  8. #8

    Default

    I had a few questions about the CKD training you wrote about. Could i start this diet as soon as i went off cycle or should i wait a couple of weeks? Also i understand the low carb day but when you were talking about the Pre-load carb day what amount of carbs should i take after my workout as you said it should be a high carb and protein drink if i weigh 220 and also for that night.

  9. #9

    Default

    I responded to your PM this AM. Did you not get it? Maybe check your settings or something...
    Quote Originally Posted by StrappingYoungLad
    Quote Originally Posted by blkdth
    I had a few questions about the CKD training you wrote about. Could i start this diet as soon as i went off cycle or should i wait a couple of weeks? Also i understand the low carb day but when you were talking about the Pre-load carb day what amount of carbs should i take after my workout as you said it should be a high carb and protein drink if i weigh 220 and also for that night.

    Thanks
    I would wait until after pct to diet. The reason being that your body is likely to be somewhat catabolic as it is post-cycle and you don't want to exacerbate that. 80g or so carbs post workout and then a "normal meal" an hour later. then 100 more grams between then and bed. This would be a guideline. Doesn't have to be exact and you could go over it a bit if you want. But something like that. Good luck man!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Croydon
    Posts
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    Default

    what about the use of ephedrine? would this knock me out of ketosis? and would it just start braking down muscle?

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